Deadwood History Calendar of Events July – September 2021

by | Jun 9, 2021 | Check This Out | 0 comments

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

July – September, 2021

July 9: History on the Lawn: The Ghost Town of Tinton, South Dakota – Established in 1903, the town of Tinton, South Dakota, now sits abandoned and alone in the last untouched area of the Northern Hills. During its fifty years of existence it shined as a juxtaposition against the well-earned reputation of the Black Hills being a gold mining region. While its mines did produce gold, they also rendered tin, mica, tantalite, feldspar, and spodumene. Historian, writer, and conservationist, Chris Hills, will explain how the town’s life was influenced by its non-traditional products and why it ultimately failed.  Bring a lunch and enjoy the Historic Adams House lawn; 12:00 p.m.; free for members and $5 for non-members. In case of inclement weather, the lecture will be moved to the Homestake Adams Research and Cultural Center (HARCC).

July 12-14: Paleontology Camp – Campers are invited to participate in Paleontology Camp where they will learn about different dinosaurs, marine reptiles, and plants that populated South Dakota millions of years ago while also understanding what it takes to be a paleontologist.  Students will create their own dinosaurs, learn how fossils are made, experience an excavation, and visit the Adams Museum’s one-of-a-kind plesiosaur.  Paleontology Camp starts and concludes at the Days of ’76 Museum.  For students going into grades 1-3; 9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.  This camp is free to participants, but reservations are required and space is limited.  Please call Amanda Brown, Education Director, at 605-578-1657 for reservations.

July 19-21: Time Traveler’s Camp – Take a trip through time with Time Traveler’s Camp and experience the different cultures that shaped Deadwood History.  Learn about the Chinese immigrants that called Deadwood home, the European settlers that populated South Dakota, and the Native Americans that have been here since the beginning.  Explore traditions, foods, histories, languages, and more that each of these groups contributed to the history of Deadwood, the Black Hills, and South Dakota.  Time Traveler’s Camp starts and concludes at the Days of ‘76 Museum.  For students going into grades 1-3; 9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.  This camp is free to participants, but reservations are required and space is limited.  Please call Amanda Brown, Education Director, at 605-578-1657 for reservations.

August 27: History on the Lawn: Sitting Bull and the Events Leading to the Battle of the Little Big Horn – In 1874 Lieutenant Colonel George Armstrong Custer led an expedition into the Black Hills where his prospectors discovered gold in French Creek, setting off a stampede to the Black Hills and leading to violent confrontations with the Lakota and other tribes. But before that happened there had been constant warfare with those tribes which had not signed the 1868 Fort Laramie Treaty. Sitting Bull was one of those leaders. When railroad survey teams passed through their hunting grounds in Dakota and Montana Territories, Sitting Bull and others fought to expel them. One of the military leaders assigned to protect the railroad surveyors was Custer. What happened during those clashes? What was Sitting Bull doing as prospectors invaded the Black Hills? What were Sitting Bull’s actions leading up to and during the Battle of the Little Big Horn? Join Bill Markley, South Dakota Humanities Council Speakers’ Bureau Scholar, author, and historian, as he discusses these questions and similar topics.  Bring a lunch and enjoy the Historic Adams House lawn; 12:00 p.m.; free for members and $5 for non-members. In case of inclement weather, the lecture will be moved to the Homestake Adams Research and Cultural Center (HARCC).

September 9: Deadwood History’s Big Thank You – Deadwood History, Inc. board of directors and staff would like to thank our members, sponsors, and volunteers for their support with a private appreciation party at the Adams Museum.  Join us for a wine-tasting sponsored by A&B Business Solutions, entertainment by Paul Vande Velde, light hors d’oeuvres, and Chubby Chipmunk Hand-Dipped Chocolates.  Adams Museum; 5:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.  Advance reservations appreciated.  Please call 605-722-4800 for reservations.

September 23: Preservation Thursday: T.J. Grier, A New Mine Superintendent for a New Century – The Homestake Mine started in 1876 as a small mining prospect claimed by the Manuel brothers using just a wheelbarrow, pick, and shovel.  However, under the management of George Hearst and Samuel McMaster it would become a district-wide operation consisting of numerous shafts, multiple mills, blacksmith shops, a spider’s web of wagon access roads, railroad connections, and logging operations.  As superintendent Samuel McMaster’s health declined, a young man would emerge to become one of the most prominent Homestake Mining Company superintendents.  At the age of 34 years old and having been hired as a mere telegrapher and accountant only six years earlier, his age and limited mining experience would belie his real hidden managerial talents.  David Vardiman will discuss how this young man would go on to lead the company for the next thirty years and take the Homestake Mine from its humble beginnings into the new twentieth century to become the world’s largest and most successful gold mine.  Homestake Adams Research and Cultural Center; 12:00 p.m.; free for members and $5 for non-members.

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